Sold! 3BR 2 BA Titusville Pool Home, Rachel DeCamp

1993 Meyers Dr, Titusville, FL 32796
SOLD AT FULL LIST PRICE!

Your True Florida home is here! Lovely 3/2/2 pool home offers an awesome decked out backyard oasis in Fox Lake Manor! Fox Lake Manor is located in West Titusville seconds from 1-95 and 20 minutes to Orlando Airport. Talk about SPACE.. This open and vaulted ceiling floor plan offers large chefs kitchen with island, and an abundance amount of cabinets. Are you ready to entertain? Sliding glass doors access through living area and master bedroom, cascades lagoon shaped pool with outdoor bar and custom deck covering. Tile in main living areas with Berber carpet in spacious bedrooms. Attractive floor plan can conveniently place most furnishings. Nice sized lot with two driveways for toys or overflow vehicles. A pleasure to show. Hot water heater 5 years old. New Pool Pump and Irrigation Pump. Listed at $185,000

 

#SolutionsPropertyManagement #RachelDeCamp

https://www.solutionsrentalsfl.com/

Renter’s Guide: Ten Tips for Tenants (HUD.gov)

Tip 1: Bring your paperwork.
The best way to win over a prospective landlord is to be prepared. To get a competitive edge over other applicants, bring the following when you meet the landlord: a completed rental application; written references from landlords, employers, and colleagues; and a current copy of your credit report.

Tip 2: Review the lease.
Carefully review all of the conditions of the tenancy before you sign on the dotted line. Your lease or rental agreement may contain a provision that you find unacceptable — for example, restrictions on guests, pets, design alterations, or running a home business. Ask questions; make sure you fully understand the lease.

Tip 3: Get everything in writing.
To avoid disputes or misunderstandings with your landlord, get everything in writing. Keep copies of any correspondence and follow up an oral agreement with a letter, setting out your understandings. For example, if you ask your landlord to make repairs, put your request in writing and keep a copy for yourself. If the landlord agrees orally, send a letter confirming this.

Tip 4: Protect your privacy rights.
Next to disputes over rent or security deposits, one of the most common and emotion-filled misunderstandings arises over the tension between a landlord’s right to enter a rental unit and a tenant’s right to be left alone. If you understand your privacy rights, for example, the amount of notice your landlord must provide before entering, it will be easier to protect them.

Tip 5: Demand repairs.
Know your rights to live in a habitable rental unit-and don’t give them up. The vast majority of landlords are required to offer their tenants livable premises, including adequate weatherproofing; heat, water, and electricity; and clean, sanitary, and structurally safe premises. If your rental unit is not kept in good repair, you have a number of options, ranging from withholding a portion of the rent, to paying for repairs and deducting the cost from your rent, to calling the building inspector (who may order the landlord to make repairs), to moving out without liability for your future rent.

Tip 6: Talk to your landlord.
Keep communication open with your landlord. If there’s a problem — for example, if the landlord is slow to make repairs — talk it over to see if the issue can be resolved short of a nasty legal battle.

Keep in mind, your first line of contact is the on-site manager. If an issue cannot be resolved at this level, it should be directed to the on-site manager’s supervisor. Legal action should be the last course of action.

Tip 7: Purchase renter’s insurance.
Your landlord’s insurance policy will not cover your losses due to theft or damage. Renters’ insurance also covers you if you’re sued by someone who claims to have been injured in your rental due to your carelessness. Renters’ insurance typically costs $350 a year for a $50,000 policy that covers loss due to theft or damage caused by other people or natural disasters; if you don’t need that much coverage, there are cheaper policies.

Tip 8: Protect your security deposit.
To protect yourself and avoid any misunderstandings, make sure your lease or rental agreement is clear on the use and refund of security deposits, including allowable deductions. When you move in, do a walk-through with the landlord to record existing damage to the premises on a move-in statement or checklist.

Tip 9: Protect your safety.
Learn whether your building and neighborhood are safe, and what you can expect your landlord to do about it if they aren’t. Get copies of any state or local laws that require safety devices such as deadbolts and window locks, check out the property’s vulnerability to intrusion by a criminal, and learn whether criminal incidents have already occurred on the property or nearby. If a crime is highly likely, your landlord may be obligated to take some steps to protect you.

Tip 10: Deal with an eviction properly.
Know when to fight an eviction notice — and when to move. If you feel the landlord is clearly is the wrong (for example, you haven’t received proper notice, the premises are uninhabitable), you may want to fight the eviction. But unless you have the law and provable facts on your side, fighting an eviction notice can be short-sighted. If you lose an eviction lawsuit, you may end up hundreds (even thousands) of dollars in debt, which will damage your credit rating and your ability to easily rent from future landlords.

Source: https://www.hud.gov/states/shared/working/r8/mf/topten

Investopedia: Leasehold Improvement

What is ‘Leasehold Improvement’

A leasehold improvement consists of alterations made to rental premises in order to customize it for the specific needs of a tenant. Leasehold improvements, such as painting, installing partitions, changing the flooring, or putting in customized light fixtures can either be undertaken by landlords, who may offer to do so to increase the marketability of their rental units, or by the tenants themselves. While the useful economic life of most leasehold improvements is 5 to 10 years, the Internal Revenue Code requires that depreciation for such improvements occur over the economic life of the building or 15 years.

BREAKING DOWN ‘Leasehold Improvement’

Landlords may pay for leasehold improvements to encourage tenants to rent spaces for longer durations. For example, a business owner is leasing a building for her disc golf shop. The landlord adds four walls to the leased area and creates built-in displays and storage areas for the discs. These alterations are considered leasehold improvements.

Ways a Landlord Pays for Leasehold Improvements

A landlord may pay for commercial leasehold improvements through a tenant improvement allowance (TIA). The landlord allows a set budget for improvements, typically $5 to $15 per square foot, and oversees the project. The tenant controls the renovation process, which may be time-consuming. In addition, if project budgets are exceeded, the tenant covers the balance.

Rent discounts may be offered for leasehold improvements as well. The landlord offers the tenant free or reduced rent for a set number of months, such as one free month per year on the lease, as a means of the tenant saving for space alterations. The tenant typically oversees the project and has control over the lease improvements. The tenant is also responsible if costs exceed the budgeted amounts. In addition, rent may be raised at a later date, causing the tenant to pay more for the space long term.

Another type of leasehold improvement is a building standard allowance. The tenant may decide among various selections the landlord provides, such as one of four colors of paint. These items might not meet the tenant’s needs, and he might not be satisfied with the results. Additional improvements are covered by the tenant. The landlord oversees the project.

Internal Revenue Service Alterations to Leasehold Improvement Rules

In December 2015, congress passed the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act. The Act modified, extended and made permanent many tax provisions related to depreciation, including leasehold improvements.

For leased space in use before Jan. 1, 2016, bonus depreciation became available for property with specific requirements. The leasehold improvements had to be made to the interior of the building, and made under a lease with only that tenant occupying the space. The landlord and tenant may not be related, and the leasehold improvement must be completed after three years of the building first being occupied for service. Under the Act, building enlargements, elevators, escalators, structural components in a common area and structural framework in the building are not considered leasehold improvements.